Fishing in Ireland, fly tying, salmon fishing

Tying for Carrowmore

‘Tis the season for fly tying and my thoughts have turned to what to try on Carrowmore next season. When fishing that lake I firmly believe I could get by with a cast of a Claret Bumble, a Green Peter and a Bibio and catch just the same number of fish but that would take away from the joys of trying out different patterns and the sweet moments of success when a salmon imbibes one of my own designs. So I sit, hunched up to the vice, for long hours each winter. New materials are tried out, variations on old reliables given a trial and occasionally some fresh ideas are brought to life. Here are some of this winter’s offerings so far………….

On a bright day early in the season, what would you reach for on Carrowmore Lake? Maybe something with a tinsel body? How about some bright hackles? I would normally go down the route of a Magenta Bumble of something similar but maybe a white fly might be worth a try instead. This one doesn’t have a name but it looks so different I think it might just work on a cold, clear day.

Hook: A small salmon iron

Silk: Black

Tag: Several turns of oval or flat silver tinsel

Tail: Fl. red floss

Rib: oval silver tinsel

Body: white baby wool (the same stuff that is used to make the Baby Doll lure)

Body Hackle: a white cock hackle, palmered

Hackle: A long fibred white cock hackle tied in front of the wing

Wing: White bucktail

 

 

At the other end of the spectrum, a dull day often requires a dark, sombre fly. Like you no doubt, my fly box bristles with Bibio’s and Watson’s Fancy variations for just such conditions. What if we add another colour to the palette though? Would a dash of purple make the difference? I like purple on the darkest of days, when the sky is low and the wind makes the boat scud across the wave tops. On Carrowmore that sends anglers scuttling back to the bar as the lake quickly churns, but in those few minutes before the colour comes in the water you can sometimes hook a fish. This pattern is tied with just that scenario in mind. I suppose you could call it a Purple Dabbler

Tag, tail and rib all tied in

Hook: A strong trout wet fly hook like the Kamasan B175 or similar. An 8 would be a good size I think.

Silk: black

Tag: Opal mirage, a couple of turns at the bend of the hook.

Tail: Bronze mallard fibres

Rib: Red wire

Body: Ballinderry black fur with a turn of purple fur under the cloak if desired

Body Hackle: Black cock hackle, palmered

Wings: Golden pheasant tippets dyed purple under a cloak of bronze mallard. Optional 2 or 3 strands of flash over the wing

Hackle: Tied in front of the wing, lots of turns of a long fibred cock hackle dyed purple.

 

This is a deadly trout fly but I fancy giving it a try in larger sizes for salmon on the lake. It is just your bog-standard Invicta with a red tail and tag. I added an extra couple of head hackles for some additional movement.

Hook: 8 or 10 trout hook

Silk: Yellow

Tag: Glo-brite no. 4

Tail: A good sized tuft of bright red wool

Rib: oval gold tinsel

Body: yellow seal’s fur

Body Hackle: dark ginger or red game cock hackle, palmered

Wing: Hen pheasant tail

Head Hackles: A red game cock hackle with a grizzle cock hackle dyed blue in front

I confess that I have yet to catch a salmon from Carrowmore on any shape or form of a daddy. A late season fly on an early season lake does not sound like a smart move but this Green Daddy might be sufficiently  different to entice a fish fed up of the endless Bibio’s and Green Peter’s. It looks nothing like a natural daddy but then it is not supposed to. I just wanted that leggy outline combined with shades of green. A Green Peter is deadly on Carrowmore and the Green Highlander takes a few fish every season so why not a Green Daddy?

Hook: size 8, normal shank wet fly

Silk: black

Tail: Formed with a bunch of cock pheasant tail fibres which have been dyed green and each one knotted twice. About a dozen fibres in total. You can add a couple of strands of krinkle flash too if you want.

Rib: Fl. Green thread

Body: Peacock tinsel

Legs: multiple cock pheasant tail fibres, dyed green and double knotted. 2 or 3 strands of green flash on top

Hackle: lots of turns of a grizzle cock hackle dyed green

You could also add a head of deer belly hair dyed green and spun muddler style if desired.

Look, none of these patterns has so much as been tied on to a leader never mind given extensive trials so they may be a total flop. But then again………………………..

 

 

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Fishing in Ireland, fly tying, trolling, trout fishing, wetfly

Trout in the freezer without wetting a line

I know I should have been fishing today. The weather was good, the fish are a bit more active than they were a few weeks ago and I had an open invite to fish Lough Conn. Instead, I pottered around in an inconclusive muddle, half finishing odd jobs and doing bits around the house. By 4pm I was done with my chores and sat down at the vice to make a few flies. You see I received a present last week of a pair of hen pheasant wings and I have been looking forward to using these beautifully marked feathers. One of the lads at work, Francie O’Toole, brought the wings in for me after his wife had hit the bird when it flew into her car.

First up a made some Purple March Brown’s. I reckon I must be the only person in Ireland who uses this pattern but it works well on difficult days. Just tie a normal March Brown but make the body out of purple dubbing and rib it with fine oval silver tinsel.

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Next up were a few Invicta’s with an opal tinsel body, just the job when the trout are hammering pin fry in the shallows. I remain unconvinced this pattern fishes any better than the standard silver version but it looks nice and bright.

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Invicta with a mirage opal body

Just like the rest of the day I became distracted and started to experiment with new ideas. I was just finished the first of these, a super bright Orkney Peach Dabbler when Ben appeared. He had fished Conn all day with only one fish to show for his unstinting efforts, a brown of around three pounds. Initial congratulations were stifled when I learned this trout had grabbed not a dainty mayfly imitation but an 11c Rapala intended for salmon. We habitually return any browns which are boated while trolling for salmon, but this guy had swallowed the Rapala and was in no condition to be returned. So instead he ended up in my freezer.

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Conn is now fishing a bit better and some good catches are being registered by anglers. A steady trickle of salmon are entering the Moy system and are being landed throughout the length of the river. I also hear that the trout fishing has improved markedly (at last)

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The Peach Dabbler tied on a size 8 – could this work for salmon?

While I remember, Francie O’Toole gave me not just the pheasant wings but also one of the pens he fashions out of bog oak. It’s a lovely thing and nice in the hand to use when scribbling on paper for a change from endless key tapping.

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A pen made from bog oak

Next weekend is going to be more organised and I am planning to fish both Saturday and Sunday. The weekend after that I will be demonstrating fly casting and fly tying at:

Féile na Tuaithe 2016  /  21 & 22 May

National Museum of Ireland – Country Life

Turlough Park, Castlebar, Co. Mayo, Ireland

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Fishing in Ireland, fly tying, trout fishing, wetfly

Invicta variants

Possibly one of the most effective all-round wet flies every concocted, the Invicta will catch trout from the first day of the season to the last. Invented in the mid nineteenth century by a chap called Ogden, it has spawned a wide range of variations and I want to share a couple of those with you today.

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Bright and easy to use, Mirage Opal tinsel

First up, the Pearly Invicta is a good fly for the times when trout become preoccupied feeding on pin fry. They can become notoriously hard to catch when this happens, probably because they have so many targets to aim for that our flies stand little chance of being singled out. When I suspect this is what is happening I look to fish quiet corners close to weed beds and work my flies in an erratic retrieve to simulate a wounded fish. I like to tie both the Silver Dabbler and the Pearly Invicta on to my cast for this type of situation.

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Tying a Pearly Invicta

My tying of the Pearly Invicta has a Golden Pheasant topping for the tail and a body of Mirage Opal tinsel for the body, ribbed with fine silver wire. The body hackle is taken from a ginger cock cape and the throat is made of Guinea Fowl dyed bright blue. A wing of hen pheasant tail is over laid with 2 or 3 strands of pearl flash.

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Pat McHale invented the next variant many years ago and it continues to give grand service to those who know of it right up to today. This dressing is identical to the original Invicta with two important exceptions. The Golden Pheasant tail is replaced with one of bright red wool. The body hackle is still the red game colour of the old fly but instead of using a cock hackle it is replaced with one taken from a hen. The softer fibres seem to make a big difference. I have caught so many trout on this fly over the years it has earned a regular place on my lough cast in just about any conditions.

Cahir Bay

Cahir Bay on Lough Mask. The Red-tailed Invicta once gave me a wonderful afternoon’s sport here during a hatch of Lake Olives

Sizes for both of these patterns range from size 8’s (think Lough Carra in a big, rolling wave) right down to size 14’s for the hill loughs. I can’t say I have ever caught a salmon on either of these flies but Pat McHale tells a stirring tale of boating a fine 9 pound springer on a Red-tailed Invicta one time off the Colman Shallows on Lough Conn. The way Pat tells it you could almost be in the boat with him when the reel screamed as the fish grabbed the size 8 fly.

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A Red-tailed Invicta

 

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