Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing, trolling

Around Conn

The forecast was fer rain but I nipped out to have a couple of hours on lough Conn this morning before the deluge started. It’s Sunday and the weekend feels like it it has slipped by already so a trip to my favourite lake was definitely in order. Now normally all the gear is nestled in the back of the old car but today I had to load up from scratch, something that always worries me these days what with my appalling memory. In the recent past i have forgotten a rod, the petrol tank for the engine, the boat keys and don’t start me of the number of occasions I have left home without  net! Today though all went smoothly and every item which was required made it safely to the lakeside.

I wonder how often I have driven the winding road to Pike Bay? It must in the hundreds by now, yet I still love the the twenty odd minutes cruising through the green countryside. I know every twist and turn (and pothole) by now but it is a journey full of happy memories for me. Days when the fish were biting or just that ease of mind knowing I was heading to the fishing. Today was going to be a difficult day no doubt with very few fish around, but I didn’t care, at least I would be out on the water.

start of the day

A leaden sky hung over the every changing vistas as the old green VW snaked along the road, alternately hemmed in by trees or exposed to views across the bog to the high ground to the west. Of wind there was not much to nil, but the forecast assured me that would change as the day wore on and a good blow was to be expected later. It had rained as I packed the car but that shower moved off to the north and it was dry until I turned on to the boreen down to Pike Bay. Big, fat rain drops splattered the windscreen from there to the spot where the boat is berthed, maybe this was going to be another damp outing for me after all. Setting up the rods and stowing the gear on board took me only a few minutes then I was off. The bank of reeds between me and open water were negotiated using the oars, it being too thick to chance using the outboard. i have done that before and only succeeded in wrapping the wire-like reed stems around the prop. Pulling on the oars in unison I cleared the reeds in no time and their soft ‘swish’ on the sides of the grey boat soon gave way to silence.

The Honda burst into life at the third pull and I puttered out of the bay, streaming three lines behind me. The rain got heavier.

Using three rods to troll on Irish loughs in not unusual, indeed I have heard of experienced trollers using more that that number with great success. It is easy enough when you are motoring along, the fun and games really begin when you either hit a fish or snag on the bottom. Suddenly you are faced with decisions on which rod to grab. If it is a fish I like to strike, slacken off the drag a bit then turn my attention to the other rods. It is necessary to get those other lines out of harms way a soon as possible. Today there were no fish but there were plenty of weeds.

on the troll

On a line I troll frequently I snagged all three baits simultaneously. All three appeared to be absolutely solid so I ca,e to a halt then knocked the engine into reverse. The following wind had strengthened and was coming from the quarter, making the boat drift very awkwardly indeed. So there I was, hand on the tiller trying hard to keep the right line while also attempting to reel in the slack line on all three rods. Needless to say this was more than a man with the normal quota of arms and hands was able to do. Slack line was stripped in but it still managed to wrap itself around the engine, creating a rare old tangle in the process. I was being pushed quickly on to the shore so I cut my losses and pulled in all three baits then motored for a shore in the lee of the wind when I could sort myself out. Two rods were quickly sorted out but the braid on the cardinal reel was in a hopeless fankle which necessitated a swift chop. That’s the trouble with braid – once it get into a tangle it is very hard to clear it.

Knotted braid

I lost a few yards of braid but at least I was back out fishing again in a few minutes. I trolled all the way down to Massbrook in a strong headwind, the spray lashing me in the face as I hunkered down in the back of the boat. In those conditions I would expect to see the odd salmon pitching in the distance but not today. A few late mayfly were hatching out but nothing molested them and they zoomed off the wind as soon as their wings were dry. I swapped baits before turning for home in the waves which had by now grown to a yard from trough to foaming crest.

Using three rods allowed me to try three different baits at the same time. A Swedish silver and copper Toby, an orange and gold Rapala and a copper spoon I bought in Poland last year were given a swim on the way back up the lake. Sometimes I use the same baits on two rods but in different sizes or weights to search at different depths. I can’t say I have ever resorted to using three identical baits at the same time but I know many anglers do that.

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A nice Tay-rigged Rapala

The return trip failed to produce any action either and the intensity of the rain grew with every passing minute. I had planned for many hours on the water but there is little joy to be found when the cold water runs down the back of your neck. Pike Bay and the warmth of the car beckoned and I answered the call gladly. Another fishless few hours for me then, a dreaded blank no less. To say this is the norm now for salmon fishers is an understatement. The poor salmon have been hunted to the very edge of extinction from what I can see and it is hard to see the situation improving. The Moy system, which Lough Conn is part of, is one of the last to hold on to a decent run of fish but even here there is a decline in numbers.

This latest belt of rain will hasten the grilse run and they will be moving up river over the coming week. I’ll try to sneak away for a few hours after work over the upcoming days. Salmon angling is all about putting in the hard hours on the water.

 

 

 

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

Typical weekend

I fished Lough Conn on Saturday morning before family commitments called me back to town then had a quiet hour or soon the Moy on Sunday evening. No fish but it was nice to be out. I’ll let the photos do the talking:

Down at Mary Robinson’s

the old 66

welcome mug of coffee

flat calm

what to try next?

Sunday and the Moy is running high

blue and silver devon

rumour is the fish are running hard and not stopping.

 

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

All quiet on Beltra

Tried a few drifts on Lough Beltra yesterday evening but there was no signs of any salmon. Jackie and Connor Deffley landed a fish apiece the day before in good conditions so there are still one or two sneaking up into the lake. Here are a few photos anyway.

Looking along the Co-op shore

waiting at the dock

On the oar

 

View from the car as I headed home. No fish but a great evening to be out and about

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

De stressing

Sometimes its just nice to be out on the river even if the fish don’t show up.

Nice light on the Moy

Yesterday evening I badly needed a couple of hours on thee river Moy. Three hours of Monthly Management Meeting earlier that day had drained me and my batteries needed a charge of fresh air and flowing water. I knew the water levels were low and catches had tailed off to virtually nil on the beat but hey, sometimes it’s not all about the fish.

Ballylaghan bridge

As you can see from the photos, it was a lovely evening to be out and about. I did not see a salmon all evening, not so much as a splash in the distance or a swirl in one of the lies. Nothing.

the second groin

I fished on, diligently working my way down river one cast per step. With nobody else on my bank I could linger at the best spots, an unusual luxury.

I stayed until the sun dipped below the western horizon then walked back to the car which was parked at the bridge. No fish but somehow that didn’t matter. With the low water I had not expected to meet a salmon, I just wanted some quiet time to myself. In this hectic, pressure cooker environment we in western society exit in the need for simply pleasures like an hour on a river bank are all too easily overlooked.

looking up river

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing, trout fishing

Boat launch

Later than normal, we dropped my boat off at Pike Bay on lough Conn this morning. It is usually some time in late March or early April that my old grey boat is unearthed from the depths of the shed and dragged up to the Conn, but this year the gods conspired against me and here we are in the month of May before the boat got launched. I was away last weekend so the planned date had to be pushed back and as a further complication there is a big charity race on in Castlebar today. That meant a reasonably early start was required so we did all our bits before the roads were closed off.

A beautiful morning with only high, thin clouds in an otherwise azure sky meant there would be no fishing today. I have spent too many long, fishless hours under a blazing sun to want to repeat that exercise, so this morning was confined to the launch only. The road up through the green countryside was a pleasure. Ireland is looking well in the late spring sunshine. We turned off at Healy’s, taking the road to Crossmolina. This piece of road badly needs some attention from the local council, potholes and bumps abound, making the driving unpleasant and tricky, especially when towing a boat trailer. The boreen down to the lake was even worse but we arrived safely and took in our surroundings before beginning the task in hand. With no rain lately the level of the lough has dropped back. The water is still cold though.

The place I tie up the boat was still vacant and there are only a handful of other boats in the bay yet. It will fill quickly now that the first mayfly are hatching though as anglers gather from around the globe to try their luck. Here’s hoping this season will be more productive than last year!

There is a gently sloping gravel bank where it is easy to slip the boat into the water only a few yards from the place she would be berthed, so we set about our jobs and got the boat ready for the water. I donned a pair of chest waders and once the boat was in the lough I hopped in and rowed her around. It felt good just to be back on the oars again.

ready for launch

A shiny new chain was used to secure the boat to a thick tree trunk and she was safely tied up. Gone are the days when a a boat and engine could simply be left on the shore, safe in the knowledge that nobody would touch them. Now there are criminal gangs who target fishing boats and do huge damage to boats to remove any engine which has been left attached. There are stories of the gangs using chain saws to chop the end off a boat to get the engine.

Soon it was time to head back home but there is great comfort knowing the boat is in a safe place and ready for use at any time. With work taking so much of my time these days I only have short sessions available to me. Now the boat is on the lake I can pop up there after work and spend a couple of hours with rod and line.

Conn has produced a couple of salmon so far this season and I hear the trout fishing, while not spectacular, has yielded some nice fish. I’m itching to get out and try it for myself.

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

New toy

So I bought this gadget for make neat loops in pieces of wire. The idea is that I will be able to salvage some old Flying C lures which have been lying around for years simply by replacing the wire and the latex skirts.

This lot have seen better days…………

The tool itself is easy enough to use once you have watched a Youtube video on it a few times. A little manual dexterity is necessary but nothing beyond a basic level of competence. the results are fine and certainly capable of fooling a salmon.

the wire forming tool

To repair a damaged Flying C I started by snipping the wire and sliding all the parts off. If the treble is still good I reuse it otherwise a look out a hook the right size. Form  ‘type B’ loop in one end of a new piece of wire (watch that video!). The hook is added to the wire and both ends are slid up the hole of the lead once a new skirt has been pushed on.

some pre-cut 6mm black tubing

From the other end slide on the bead(s) and the clevis which holds the blade. Now form a ‘type 1’ bend and snip off the waste end of the wire. Voila!

completed lure

The tool and all the bits and bobs you may require are readily available so even if you need blades or other parts you can lay your hands on them via online retailers.

latex skirts in different colours

I’ll put the tool away for now but come next winter I will be busy with it repairing lures for the 2020 season.

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