Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

End of season boat lift

Today was a big day for the Glenisland Coop, we lifted all the boats out of the lake. As many members as we could muster gathered at 3pm and amid heavy showers we rowed the boats to the bank, dragged them to the shed or the space behind it and turned the boats over. Heavy, back breaking work but a job that has to be done. Being part of an angling club means that you enjoy access to the fishing but also you need to pull your weight when the hard work needs to be done. Today was made easier by the jovial atmosphere and the willingness of everyone to ‘muck in’ and get the job done. All the boats are safely ashore now and the ones for varnishing are in the boat shed. Thanks to everyone who helped out today, it was a great team effort. Here are some photos of the day.

the first two boats safely in the boathouse

turning a boat over so it can be power hosed

The hardy souls who braved the weather to fetch the boats in. Sartorial elegance was optional.

The harbour empty now, we leave the lough in peace for the winter.

 

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

All quiet on Beltra

Tried a few drifts on Lough Beltra yesterday evening but there was no signs of any salmon. Jackie and Connor Deffley landed a fish apiece the day before in good conditions so there are still one or two sneaking up into the lake. Here are a few photos anyway.

Looking along the Co-op shore

waiting at the dock

On the oar

 

View from the car as I headed home. No fish but a great evening to be out and about

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Fishing in Ireland, Walks in Mayo

Earlier this week

May is the height of the season here in Mayo with so much going on for anyone interested in the outdoors it is hard to fit in such necessities as work and sleep. The long, long winter has finally released her grip and we can look forward to the softer weather of spring and summer at last.Here is how this past few days have panned out.

It was a Bank Holiday on Monday so Helen and I went for a long walk around Lough Furnace. This is a lovely walk with some great views across the loughs and mountains of Burrishool. Despite living in the area for many years I have never fished Furnace. This fishery does not open until the middle of June and can provide exciting fishing for grilse on its day.

view from the old bridge

We walked along quiet single track roads from the community centre at Derrada, out past the research centre, along a short section of the ancient road that used to link Newport with Bangor and finally on a short stretch of the new Greenway.

 

the salmon research centre

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The old road to Bangor

On Wednesday evening the wet and wild weather tempted me and Ben out on to lough Beltra. The conditions could not have been better, a strong blow from the south and dark overhead conditions looked to be exactly what the salmon enjoy and we met up on the shore in high spirits and full of hope we would meet a salmon or two. Unfortunately the fish had other ideas and we failed to rise a single fish. Four other boats which were out on the Glenisland Coop side also came in fishless.

the sun trying to break through the thick cover of clouds over Beltra

Another boat drifts behind us

The wall

The boatshed on the Glenisland side, a great resource for the club

So it is back to the drawing board again! I hear that Lough Mask is fishing well, with Toby Gibbons winning the Westport club competition last weekend. He had a nice bag of 4 trout on the day. I will venture out again this weekend to try my luck.

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

An evening on Beltra

I will leave the photos to tell the tale of an evening spent on Lough Beltra in the company of Ben and Pat. The fish did not cooperate but it was great just to be afloat on a pleasant Spring evening.

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deep in concentration

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Pat helping to make some space in my fly box!

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You can just make out the marker buoy below Nephin

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I had a bag of reels with different lines on them but I stuck to my slow sinker all evening

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Drifting in towards the dock (a good lie for salmon)

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A heavy shower passed over us

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Great conditions as the sun dipped but nobody told the fish!

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End of the day and we head back to the shore

We all want to catch fish when we head out to the lough or river but blanks are a part of our sport and we need to accept them as the opportunity to enjoy our surroundings.

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

Beltra this evening

Tried Lough Beltra for a few hours this evening but with no success. The wind was good for drifting the Coop shore but the fish were unresponsive. Bright conditions gave way to some high cloud as the sun set but the outstanding feature of the evening was the cold. Still no sign of Spring in this part of the West of Ireland. At least I managed to take a few snaps.

The only action was a small fish of around a couple of pounds slashing at the bob fly as we drifted along the shore of Walsh’s Bay. It looked like a sea trout kelt to me (certainly too small to be a spring salmon).

snow still hanging around on Nephin

Even the faithful Badger could not tempt a fish

on the engine

Morrisons

Sunset

Walsh’s bay

Ben, deep in concentration

So, no fish but a great evening to be out and about on the lough. The winds are due to slacken off as the week goes on so Beltra will be out of order but Carrowmore should pick up. I could be in Bangor next week!

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

Tips for Beltra

 

Ben bending into a springer

Ben Baynes bends into a springer on Beltra a few seasons ago

March 20th marks the start of the salmon season on Ireland’s Lough Beltra. If you are one of the lucky few who will be fishing the lough this spring here are a few pointers which may help you to connect with one of those shiny springers.

  • Be prepared for the weather! Being cold or wet is going to ruin your day on the lough, so make sure you wear plenty of layers of clothing and have a good hat on your head. A proper waterproof jacket and leggings are a must. Whilst not a dangerous lake, you still need to wear a lifejacket at all times.
  • If you are fishing the Lough for the first time then consider using a boatman for your first trip out on the water. A boatman will know the lies and be able to put you over all the likely spots. They will also control the boat, allowing you to concentrate on casting and fishing.
  • Sticking to it. Every successful salmon fisher I know has a tenacity which earns them fish. A dogged determination to keep casting and retrieving hour after hour. On Beltra this trait is particularly vital in my opinion. Beltra can be very dour for long periods then suddenly switch on. The angler who spends as much time as possible casting over the lies stands the best chance of meeting a fish.
  • Don’t waste time fishing deep water. I know there are always exceptions, but the fish in Beltra like to lie in shallow water. If you are casting over water any deeper than the length of an oar the chances are you are in water devoid of taking salmon.
  • Use a sinking line. Again, I know of exceptions when floating lines have worked in the springtime but in general you need to get down to the fish on Lough Beltra. A wetcell 2 or similar line is fine.
  • Fish a good sized fly. I love fishing small flies for summer salmon but March / April on Lough Beltra means size 4 or 6 hooks. I am less worried about pattern than getting the size right and I would not think of using a small fly until the water has warmed up in May.
  • Move around to find the fish. Salmon can be scattered all over the lough so even if you hear there are fish in one particular spot I still think it is better to keep searching all likely water.
  • Don’t cross the line! Newport House fish the North side of the lough and the Glenisland Coop fish the south side with an invisible line running roughly down the middle of the water. Please stick to the side of the lough you have permission to fish and don’t stray on to the other side.
  • Ask the locals for advice. We have some very experienced Beltra experts who fish the lough frequently and know the moods of the water. Ask them for advice you will find them forthcoming and happy to help out in any way.

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Fishing in Ireland, salmon fishing

Wind and waves

It’s getting close now. The cold weather can’t disguise lengthening days. Daffodils are blooming, an incongruent splash of sulphur yellow against the washed out land. New buds are showing on the trees and bushes in the garden promising green foliage in the coming weeks. Yes, it is definitely getting close – the opening of the season on Lough Beltra.

In previous posts I have talked about fly patterns for Beltra but today I want to share some of the lies where you can expect salmon and the importance of the wind for sport on the lough. So let’s start with some basics of lough salmon fishing first.

 

Any angler here in the West of Ireland will tell you that the biggest factor for success is the wind when fishing still water. The premise of ‘no wind = no fish’ is not 100% accurate as the very occasional salmon can be tempted in flat calm conditions, but this is such a rarity that it can almost be categorised as a statistical anomaly. What you need is a good, strong wind whipping the surface up into waves. Some fishers will tell you that there is no such thing as a wind that is too strong but I disagree with that point of view. Fishing, or rather trying to fish in a gale is not my idea of fun as casting becomes difficult, tangles more frequent and the ability to move the fly how I want to is compromised. For me a steady force 5 or so is just fine; a gusting 7 or 8 is not my cup of tea.

 

Captain Ben!

Next in importance is the direction of the wind and nowhere is that more so than on the Glenisland Coop water on Lough Beltra. Wind direction is a topic which could fill a good sized book, but to keep it simple the wind needs to come from a direction which does not hinder the drifts over the salmon lies. Note that I did not say it must assist you. Sometimes all you can manage is a breeze which is sort of nearly in the right direction but vigarous work with the oars is required to keep drifting over the fish. The Glenisland Coop side of Beltra fishes best when the wind is in either a South West or North East direction, ie. blowing directly up or down the lough. A North westerly is very difficult as you will be blown directly on to the shore and as the fish lie within 30 yards or so of the rocks this means you only get one or two casts before pulling back out into the lake, obviously a huge amount of work for very little return. A South Easterly is even worse as the high ground on the Glenisland road side blocks the wind from that quarter leaving the fishable water in flat calm.

So where exactly do the salmon lie in Lough Beltra?

 

I am going to keep this very, very simple for those of you who are visitors to Beltra and are fishing the Glenisland Coop fishery (Beltra East). Look at the map above and note where the L136 road passes close the the shore. You want to be drifting along that shore between 10 and 30 yards out from the edge. That’s it. Locals all know exact spots along that shore to concentrate on but if you don’t know the water just drift the full length of the shore and you won’t go far wrong. You will hear of specific salmon lies such as Morrisons and the Red Barn (now confusingly painted grey) but in a good wind the boat will drift the full length of the shore in around 30 minutes, so time over unproductive water is not too great. Walshes Bay can also be good as can the buoy out from Flannery’s Pier which marks the dividing line between the east and West fisheries.

 

Now let’s turn to Carrowmore Lake in North Mayo for a very different set of circumstances and the effects wind will have on your day’s fishing. Carrowmore is set amid extensive bog land, largely flat with little to break the wind from any direction. You can see the Atlantic Ocean just a few hundred yards away so this is obviously a windy spot. That should be good, right? Plenty of wind for that all important wave? Well, ‘Yes’ but……………

 

The surrounding bog does not stop at the lake shores but continues under the water. Run off from the countryside deposits huge volumes of fine peat silt into the lake which settles on the bottom where it lies in clam weather. Problems start when the wind gets up and causes waves which stir up this fine silt, turning the lake the colour of Oxtail soup. This happens frequently as the lake is shallow and any wind above a fours 4 or so is going to turn the water cloudy. I don’t know if there is any proof the fish go off the take when the water colours but I have never seen a salmon caught in those conditions and the received wisdom is the fish become uncatchable in the brown water.

Glencullen

beginning to churn on Carrowmore

 

One possible ray of hope when confronted with the silt colour on Carrowmore is to look for other parts of the lake which are not affected. Sometimes the wind from a certain quarter churns one area but leaves another part of the lake clear. Local knowledge really comes to the fore here and visitors will find it hard to figure out where the clear water is without consulting the local guru’s.

 

More info on the Glenisland Coop water is available on the club website http://www.loughbeltra.com

The lough opens on 20th March

 

 

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